My Memories of the Real Great Depression

The “Depression”, which most who lived through it had almost forgotten, came roaring back as a topic when the Great Recession began in 2007, and which 75% of Americans think isn’t over as of 2012 though the Business Cycle Dating Committee says it ended in June 2009.

Maybe the best way to describe the 1930’s depression is through the eyes of a little kid–me. Continue reading

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I Go AWOL to Paris and Find a Career – Part 3

After the fighting ended in Europe, when an opportunity for fun or doing work that was interesting presented itself, I was determined to make the most of it. In parts one and two, I described how my buddies and I got transferred to the MP’s outside Antwerp in Belgium but opted instead to go AWOL to Paris in search of better jobs. During a tryout at Stars and Stripes, the Army daily newspaper, I’d impressed the editors enough to get them to send for me once they had the address of my new unit.

Back in Antwerp, my buddies Charlie and Bob decided to try again for a way to avoid the MPs.

At the area headquarters, a major interviewed the two in a hallway, giving their resumes quick glances. “No, nothing for you here,” he said, “report to the MPs.” Then he motioned for me to come forward and looked at my records, “You stay,” he said.

See, there’s your proof about the advantage of a college education. Continue reading

I Go AWOL to Paris and Find a Career – Part 2

Me and a couple of buddies on one of our "excursions". (I'm in the middle.)

I went AWOL (Absent Without Official Leave) three times during my military service. It was no great drama like it might be in a movie. For example, once just after the Germans surrendered I got a pass to go to England for a week. My buddies and I enjoyed it so much we stayed for three weeks. The war was over and the Army wasn’t paying much attention so we figured no one would notice, and they didn’t. But it was a short “excursion” to Paris that impacted my writing career.

In Part 1 I talked about how a couple of buddies and I took a train to Paris using some forged three-day passes. Charlie and Bob went looking for a job at Special Services producing shows for the troops, but it didn’t work out. I decided to try for a job at the Army daily newspaper, Stars and Stripes, also located in Paris. The officer I spoke to there asked if I had done any “desk work”.

I had no idea what he meant but I said I had. He asked me “at what newspaper?” I named the Bronx Home News, a small paper in one of the five boroughs of New York City my family read. But I had never worked there.

The officer took me to where the paper was edited, which was when I learned what he meant by desk work. He was referring to editing articles and writing headlines, which was done as a group activity at the copy desk. Continue reading

I Go AWOL to Paris and Find a Career – Part 1

After Germany surrendered in 1945, the U.S. Army lost control of its huge force in Europe. At least they lost control of rambunctious soldiers like me.

The control began to slip when the Army disbanded units like the 280th Combat Engineers where I had served as America beat Germany on its home turf. My roots were cut and I was transferred to Antwerp in Belgium to join what my orders said was a Machine Records Company.  And I wondered, what the hell is that?

I’d grown accustomed to living in comfortable apartments we had taken over from Germans so when I arrived at a tent village in the middle of a swamp in Antwerp I was mad and ready to do battle.

I had a target immediately. A second lieutenant sat behind a desk wearing a tie neatly tucked into his well-pressed shirt. Wow. I hadn’t seen anyone wearing a tie during 18 months in Europe’s combat zones.

The lieutenant studied my Army bio, which showed I had two years of college before I enlisted. Continue reading

Taste Test in a World War II Blackout

Mad Men, the TV show about advertising in the 1960s, takes place just at the dawn age of television commercials. It was then that the taste test became prominent.

Blindfold an actor and feed him/her two competing products. The sponsor’s product is chosen as best.

But that blindfold test idea must have been created long before TV. I saw it used during World War II in a blacked-out German farmhouse where our squad of combat engineers was preparing for a night spent clearing mines from a road. Continue reading